DEA Approves Synthetic Weed

Politics, History, & 'Conspiracy'
User avatar
Masato
Site Admin
Posts: 10300
Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2012 3:16 pm
Reputation: 4823

DEA Approves Synthetic Weed

Postby Masato » Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:46 pm

...to a Big Pharma company that was AGAINST legalization :o

DEA approves synthetic marijuana for big pharma company against legalization
http://bloomsmag.com/dea-approves-synth ... alization/

A synthetic marijuana product could be available for commercialization after the DEA gave a newly approved drug a schedule II classification.

On Thursday, Insys Therapeutics announced that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) issued an interim final rule that would put Syndros, their synthetic marijuana drug, on Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

“Insys is looking forward to bringing this new drug product to chemotherapy patients to help alleviate their nausea and vomiting and AIDS patients with anorexia associated weight loss, respectively,” Dr. Santosh Vetticaden, interim CEO, said in the announcement.

“We look forward to interacting with the FDA to finalize the labeling and subsequent launch of Syndros in the second half of 2017,” Vetticaden said.

Syndros is a synthetic version of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component in the plant. In July 206, the company announced the FDA approved their liquid form of synthetic THC to treat anorexia associated AIDS patients, and nausea and vomiting induced by cancer patients going through chemotherapy.

The DEA approval placed Syndros and its generic formulations in schedule II of the CSA, which is reserved for drugs that have “a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence.”

While some Schedule II drugs can be used for medical purposes, like Vicodin, oxycodone, Adderall, and many prescription painkillers, Schedule I drugs are all federally illegal. Non-synthetic marijuana is a Schedule I drug, which is reserved for drugs that have “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”

In 2011, Insys wrote a letter to the DEA, urging them to maintain the Schedule I status for non-synthetic marijuana, citing “a longstanding policy of the United States to disfavor domestic cultivation of narcotic raw materials because of concerns about the abuse potential from farming of this material.”

Insys also opposed legalization in Arizona, donating $500,000 to Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy, a group opposing Proposition 205, an initiative to legalize and regulate marijuana like alcohol in Arizona.

In a statement, Insys said it opposed Prop 205, “because it fails to protect the safety of Arizona’s citizens, and particularly its children,” according to the Arizona Republic.

The proposition was narrowly defeated in the state, meaning users in Arizona could face felony charges for possessing even small amounts of the plant.

JP Holyoak, chairman of the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol in Arizona, says Insys funded the opposition “to kill a non-pharmaceutical market for marijuana in order to line their own pockets,” according to the Washington Post.

In 2007, Insys filed a disclosure statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, directly stating that marijuana legalization would threaten their products.

“If marijuana or non-synthetic cannabinoids were legalized in the United States, the market for dronabinol product sales would likely be significantly reduced and our ability to generate revenue and our business prospects would be materially adversely affected,” the company said.

The company is currently under investigation for illegally marketing Fentanyl, an opioid that is 50 times stronger than heroin, which has been linked to the death of Prince last year. LOL

In December, several executives at the company were arrested and the CEO was forced to step down after they were charged with using speakers fees to entice doctors to prescribe Subsys, a medication for cancer patients that contains Fentanyl.




“You have a company using profits from the sale of what has been called ‘the most potent and dangerous opioid on the market’ to prevent adults from using a far less harmful substance,” Holyoak said according to the Arizona Republic.

User avatar
Masato
Site Admin
Posts: 10300
Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2012 3:16 pm
Reputation: 4823

Postby Masato » Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:47 pm

I know in many ways it seems like we're making progress on the weed issue, but things like this make me think twice

User avatar
Daglord
Posts: 1475
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2014 2:25 pm
Reputation: 2911

Postby Daglord » Wed Sep 27, 2017 6:30 pm

all progress is being destroyed by the new administration & their renewed 'war on drugs'.

Daglord wrote:Jeff Sessions is ordering the Justice Department to review its policy on marijuana
http://www.businessinsider.com/justice-department-task-force-will-review-weed-enforcement-policy-2017-4

Image

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has directed the Justice Department to evaluate marijuana 'enforcement policy' as part of a new task force designed to reduce violent crime, according to a memo issued Wednesday to 94 US attorneys.

The memo specifically outlined the creation of a subcommittee of the new Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety designed to review existing policies to ensure "consistency with the Department's overall strategy on reducing violent crime."

The memo is likely referring to the Cole Memorandum, a 2013 directive from the Obama era which stipulates that the Justice Department place "low priority" on enforcing marijuana laws against businesses and organizations that comply with state law.

Marijuana is illegal at the federal level, though a number of states have voted to legalize and regulate the recreational market in recent years.

However, Sessions has previously said that he's not a fan of the "expanded use" of marijuana, and the Trump administration has hinted at a crackdown on state-legal marijuana enterprises.

A group of governors from states that have recreational marijuana laws on the books wrote a letter urging Sessions to keep marijuana legal on Tuesday.

Reducing violent crime is a priority for Sessions' Justice Department, to combat what he says is a dangerous national trend of rising crime associated with the opioid epidemic. And, he's made efforts to link marijuana to violent crime, saying there's "more violence around marijuana" at a speech to state attorneys general in February.

Violent crime rates are at a historic low, though rates rose 3% between 2014 and 2015, according to the FBI.

Trump himself hasn't yet laid out a specific policy towards marijuana legalization.


but wait, there's more...

DEA OKs synthetic marijuana for pharma company that spent $500,000 to keep pot illegal
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-dea-pharma-synthetic-marijuana-20170325-story.html

Image

Insys Therapeutics, a pharmaceutical company that was one of the chief financial backers of the opposition to marijuana legalization in Arizona last year, received preliminary approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration this week for Syndros, a synthetic marijuana drug.

Insys gave $500,000 last summer to Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy, the group opposing marijuana legalization in Arizona. The donation amounted to roughly 10 percent of all money raised by the group in an ultimately successful campaign against legalization. Insys was the only pharmaceutical company known to be giving money to oppose legalization last year, according to a Washington Post analysis of campaign finance records.


How Jeff Sessions Wants To Bring Back the War on Drugs
http://reason.com/blog/2017/04/10/how-jeff-sessions-wants-to-bring-back-th

Image

Is the Trump administration going war crazy? Last week, the president launched a missile strike on a Syrian air base as retaliation for the Assad regime reportedly gassing its own people.

And now, The Washington Post reports, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who is adamantly against marijuana legalization, is ready to escalate the war on drugs by pulling former federal prosecutor Steven H. Cook into his inner circle.




For his part, Sessions has explicitly called for a return to "Just Say No" policies that included mandatory minimums and all sorts of sentencing enhancements that swelled prison populations. Calling pot "only slightly less awful" than heroin, he has also signaled that he will continue to pursue legal action against marijuana users even in states where it has been made legal for medical and recreational use.

Why the CARERS Act is so significant for marijuana policy reform
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2016/04/13/why-the-carers-act-is-so-significant-for-marijuana-policy-reform/

Image

User avatar
Daglord
Posts: 1475
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2014 2:25 pm
Reputation: 2911

Postby Daglord » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:10 pm

Meanwhile... as they are approve synthetic, the DOJ is shutting down legit cannabis research.

Jeff Sessions Just Made the Chief of the DEA Look Like a Pot Head's Hero
http://reason.com/blog/2017/09/27/jeff-sessions-just-made-the-head-of-the

Image

Around this time last year, the Drug Enforcement Administration announced it would begin accepting applications for a license to cultivate marijuana for research purposes. This was thrilling news for cannabis advocates, as it suggested the DEA was finally open to ending the University of Mississippi's 50-year monopoly on legal marijuana cultivation.

"The DEA just made it easier do research on weed," a Wired headline declared.

A year after that announcement, the DEA has yet to approve a single license application and now acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg is set to resign over differences with the Justice Department. One of those differences? The Justice Department's refusal to let the DEA grant any licenses to grow research marijuana.

"[T]he Justice Department has effectively shut down this program to increase research registrations," an anonymous DEA source told the Washington Post in August of this year. "They're sitting on it," another source said of cultivation applications the DEA sent to the Justice Department for final approval.

When STAT News asked the DEA in July how many licenses it had granted, they got smoke-screened. "The DEA says it does not have a timeline to approve or deny applications and noted that it is dealing with a new review process," STAT's Andrew Joseph reported. "All applicants remain under review and none has been rejected." Now we know it's because Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his people are keeping those applications in regulatory limbo.

In an August 2016 letter to the governors of Rhode Island and Washington, Rosenberg, who will likely be out of his role by the end of the week, wrote that marijuana would only be rescheduled through the FDA's drug approval process, but that the DEA would "continue to work with NIDA to ensure that there is a sufficient supply of marijuana and its derivatives to support legitimate research needs. Part of that support includes "approving additional growers of marijuana to supply researchers."

The Washington Post asked Rosenberg last month if he'd changed his mind on the latter promise. His response: "I stand by what I wrote." That's the closest thing I've seen to Rosenberg publicly pointing the finger at his boss.

In addition to battling over marijuana cultivation licenses, Rosenberg reportedly disagreed with Sessions that MS-13 is a major factor in the American drug trade (Rosenberg is more worried about Mexican cartels). He also condemned President Donald Trump's speech to police officers in Long Island, during which Trump encouraged cops to rough up suspects. "When you see these towns and when you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon—you just see them thrown in, rough—I said please don't be too nice," Trump told the audience.

"The President, in remarks delivered yesterday in New York, condoned police misconduct regarding the treatment of individuals placed under arrest by law enforcement," Rosenberg wrote in an email to DEA staff.

Rosenberg didn't quit solely over marijuana research, and his support for more heavily controlled cultivation certainly doesn't amount to support for marijuana legalization. But his exit from the DEA gives Sessions a chance to install—via Trump's nomination—someone who won't press the marijuana issue at all.


Image

DEA AND JUSTICE DEPARTMENT AT ODDS ON MEDICAL POT RESEARCH
http://hightimes.com/news/dea-and-justice-department-at-odds-on-medical-pot-research/

A year ago, the DEA began accepting applications to grow more marijuana for research. They now have 25 proposals to consider, but they need the Department of Justice (DOJ) to sign-off in order to move forward.

So, of course, Jeff Sessions is ignoring them. Actually, he’s blocking them.

“They’re sitting on it,” said one law enforcement official familiar with the matter. “They just will not act on these things.”

As a result, said one senior DEA official quoted in the Washington Post, “the Justice Department has effectively shut down this program to increase research registrations.’’

DEA spokesman Rusty Payne said the agency “has always been in favor of enhanced research for controlled substances such as marijuana.’’

It seems no one can make headway with Jeff Sessions’ radical agenda for weed, which avows restarting the War on Drugs, including destroying medical marijuana programs and seizing people’s assets when they have never committed a crime.

Even DEA officials have publicly and privately questioned some of Sessions’ outlandish statements and thoroughly mistaken concepts.

The DEA-DOJ standoff is just the latest example of how out of step Sessions is with the world around him. His modus operandi has been to blatantly reject scientific research on the subject of cannabis.

For reasons best known to himself, acting DEA administrator Chuck Rosenberg, appointed by President Obama in 2015, has declined to remove marijuana from its Schedule 1 classification, which states that it has “no medical use.”

While the DEA complains that their research plans are stalling under Sessions, reclassifying cannabis to Schedule II would make it a lot easier for scientists to study it.

In a letter he wrote in August 2016, Rosenberg said the DEA would “support and promote legitimate research regarding marijuana and its constituent parts.”

In the same letter, Rosenberg said the DEA had already approved such research and had registered 354 people and institutions to study marijuana, including the effects of smoked marijuana on humans.

In fact, it appeared at the time, that the DEA was willing to expand the studies and was asking for applications from people who wanted to grow marijuana to be used for research.

At the moment the only source of marijuana for research is being grown by the University of Mississippi, and it is known to be of the lowest possible quality.

One DEA applicant is Lyle Craker, a professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, who has been waiting for years for approval to do research on MMJ.

“I’ve filled out the forms, but I haven’t heard back from them. I assume they don’t want to answer,’’ Craker said. “They need to think about why they are holding this up when there are products that could be used to improve people’s health. I think marijuana has some bad effects, but there can be some good, and without investigation we really don’t know.’’

Brad Burge, spokesman for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), said that the federal government has prevented important research into marijuana for years.

“That’s a sad state of affairs,’’ said Burge. “If the DEA is now asking for permission to say yes, then the resistance is now further up the chain of command.’’

Rosenberg indicated to the Washington Post that he still would support more marijuana research.

“I stand by what I wrote,” said Rosenberg.

If that is true, can you please step up to the plate? Lives are at stake.

Image

User avatar
Redneck
Posts: 345
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 7:44 am
Reputation: 243

Postby Redneck » Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:22 am

This is always where legal weed was headed, regardless of which administration was shuffling papers and reading from teleprompters.

If Big Pharma wasn't going to be able to claim it's stake at some stage then it never would have been approved in any state.

Much like the heroin market, Big Pharma sells more opiates to people than heroin dealers do, and Big Pharma's Oxycontin (Heroin) has caused more deaths than the street stuff.

When Trump recently addressed the "opiates problem" that plagues America, he neglected to go into detail, but the real opiates problem is coming from Big Pharma, and their dealer network of M.D's and Chemist stores.

User avatar
Daglord
Posts: 1475
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2014 2:25 pm
Reputation: 2911

Postby Daglord » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:50 pm

Redneck wrote:This is always where legal weed was headed, regardless of which administration was shuffling papers and reading from teleprompters.

If Big Pharma wasn't going to be able to claim it's stake at some stage then it never would have been approved in any state.

Much like the heroin market, Big Pharma sells more opiates to people than heroin dealers do, and Big Pharma's Oxycontin (Heroin) has caused more deaths than the street stuff.

When Trump recently addressed the "opiates problem" that plagues America, he neglected to go into detail, but the real opiates problem is coming from Big Pharma, and their dealer network of M.D's and Chemist stores.


good post. I know this probably seems like I'm taking another (well deserved IMO) shot @ Trump, but gotta (somewhat) disagree & agree with masato. I really do think progress was made re: marijuana in the last 5 or so years. can't speak for anywhere other than the US, but the attitude here towards it has completely flipped.

credit where credit is due - the Obama administration gave the states back their right to decide on both medicinal & recreational without fed obsruction (besides the bank thing). IIRC, 30 states have approved medicinal while close to 10 have legalized recreational use. he also approved the Rorhabacher act which prohibited the DOJ from using federal funds to interfere with state marijuana laws. Obama was an advocate, equating it with cigarettes & alcohol. it took Holder some time, but it was seen as a HUGE victory for marijuana reform. unfortunately, it has to be renewed every year, but word is Trump is in favor of keeping it. time will tell.

honestly, I'd say the only thing Obama got wrong re: marijuana was not rescheduling it. according to him, that's all on the DEA.

re: other candidates, both a Paul & Sanders administration would have continued along the same path IMO. both advocating states' rights, research, & rescheduling during their campaign - along with criminal justice reform. Paul just recently sponsored the CARERS ACT & is also pushing for Hemp to be excluded/legalized. there is a lot of bipartisan support for marijuana reform in congress, but it's now being blocked at the Federal level. Trump continues to name the worst of the worst (Sessions, Price, Kelly, etc) to the most crucial positions (AG, DEA, HHS, Homeland Security) & after claiming to want to eliminate the office of the Drug Czar, he instead nominates Tom Marino to head it. Almost immediately after that, names Chris Christie to lead the Commission on Combating Drug Addiction & declares a "national Opioid epidemic".

haven't even gotten into Tom Marino yet in the Trump thread, it just happened.

Tom Marino: Just another anti-marijuana, pro-pharma drug czar
http://www.philly.com/philly/business/cannabis/Tom-Marino-Just-another-anti-marijuana-pro-pharma-drug-czar.html

Congressman Tom Marino of Pennsylvania is the perfect choice for drug czar because President Donald Trump is assembling a team of old-school drug warriors at the White House whose favorite things include marijuana prohibition, civil asset forfeiture, and mandatory drug treatment for cannabis consumers.

Marino is no spring chicken to the septic tanks of politics. Sitting on the House Judiciary and Foreign Relations committees, he is one of the true political elites on the Hill who are privy to a long list of secrets that require billions in taxpayer money.

His sparse voting record on marijuana related bills? All negative, and that's no surprise.

This is the first time a member of Congress has been picked to lead the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Moving from such an entrenched legislative position to that of a mere presidential appointee does seem odd for Marino. But the jump makes sense given his long and amicable dealings with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, along with an existing relationship with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

Christie and Pam Bondi of Florida have been tapped by Trump to deal with opiates. With Marino, Trump's front line against American marijuana consumers is now complete and ready to work with their pal Sessions.

Pam Bondi, the chick from FL who dropped the Trump U lawsuit against him in exchange for $25K (& a spot in his administration)?

To make it all feel extra gross, Marino takes money from pharmaceutical companies and lobbyists. That has no shock value, because almost all high-level politicians in N.J. and Pa. – especially the Congressional delegations – take some form of pharma campaign cash. Thanks to superPACs, we don't even really know how much. But again, that's just business as usual around here.

Image

As a member of Congress since 2011, Marino has consistently voted against marijuana law reform measures on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives.

For example, he voted three times against amendments to prevent the Justice Department from interfering with state medical marijuana laws.

He also opposed a broader amendment to protect all state marijuana laws from Justice Department interference.

Marino voted three times against amendments to allow military veterans to receive medical cannabis recommendation through Department of Veterans Affairs doctors.

He also consistently opposed measures to allow industrial hemp.

And he even voted against a measure sponsored by a fellow Pennsylvania Republican to protect limited state cannabidiol (CBD) medical cannabis programs from federal interference.

Marino is a former state and federal prosecutor. In testimony before the House Ways and Means Committee last year, Marino appeared to advocate for forced hospitalization of people who use drugs.

“One treatment option I have advocated for years would be placing nondealer, nonviolent drug abusers in a secured hospital-type setting under the constant care of health professionals,” he wrote. “Once the person agrees to plead guilty to possession, he or she will be placed in an intensive treatment program until experts determine that they should be released under intense supervision. If this is accomplished, then the charges are dropped against that person. The charges are only filed to have an incentive for that person to enter the hospital-slash-prison, if you want to call it.”

https://www.massroots.com/news/new-trump-drug-czar-voted-against-marijuana-amendments-in-congress

then came Christie (the last guy you want leading the 'war on addiction' IMO):

Image

Presidential Executive Order Establishing the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis
https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/03/30/presidential-executive-order-establishing-presidents-commission

and shortly after:

Christie pleads for Trump to declare opioid crisis a national public health emergency
http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/31/politics/chris-christie-plea-report-opioid-commission-national-emergency/index.html

(CNN)New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie called for President Donald Trump to elevate the opioid epidemic to a national public health emergency in an interview with CNN's Jake Tapper Monday.

"We hope that the President declares a public health emergency in this country," Christie said, speaking on behalf of the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis.

"We have a 9/11-scale loss every three weeks," Christie said

these are all people being either being rewarded for their early support of Trump (not that there is anything wrong with that) or being put in place to install draconian drug laws.

IMHO, the Trump administration is a throwback to Reagan's eighties & the "just say no"/"war on drugs" era. a HUGE step back in regards to marijuana & criminal justice reform. Obama might have been the most weed-friendly President of our time & we are still trending in a positive direction. Will be interesting to see if/how the Trump administration fights or allows it. I haven't seen anything encouraging from them so far.

could anyone be more out of touch than this?

Chris Christie says 'crazy liberals' want to 'poison our kids' with marijuana
http://www.businessinsider.com/chris-christie-attacks-weed-legalization-2017-5

New Jersey governor Chris Christie called supporters of marijuana legalization "crazy liberals" who want to "poison our kids" during a talk at a substance abuse conference on Monday, according to Politico.

"They want that blood money? Let them do it," Christie said, referring to tax revenue generated by legal marijuana sales.

"And they will. Let me tell you something — this will be like priority number one come January. I guarantee you, if we have a Democratic governor, it will be priority number one."

Nick Scutari, a New Jersey state senator, is currently introducing a bill to legalize marijuana. Scutari's bill has the support of both Steve Sweeney, the Senate president, and Vincent Prieto, the Assembly Speaker, according to the Star-Ledger.

"People like Nick Scutari and Steve Sweeney and Phil Murphy [leading Democratic candidate for governor] want to bring this poison, legalized, into this state under the premise that, well, it doesn’t matter because people can buy it illegally anyway," Christie said on Monday.

"Then why not legalize heroin? I mean, their argument fails just on that basis. Let’s legalize cocaine. Let’s legalize heroin. Let’s legalize angel dust. Let’s legalize all of it. What’s the difference? Let everybody choose," Christie added.

Christie asserted that teenage marijuana users are 10 times more likely to become heroin addicts by age 24, without citing any evidence, reports Politico.



[spoiler]
On August 14, 2013, Brian Wilson of Scotch Plains, N.J. confronted Gov. Chris Christie over his delay in signing a law that would make it possible for Wilson's two-year-old daughter to receive the medical marijuana she was prescribed under state law. The testy exchange was quickly picked up by numerous media outlets.

Vivian Wilson suffers from Dravet's Syndrome, a devastating and potentially fatal form of epilepsy that she will never outgrow. It's already led to one hour-long seizure where she stopped breathing and had to be resuscitated.

Although medical marijuana has been legal in New Jersey for three-and-a-half years, Christie's Department of Health has made it nearly impossible for patients to obtain medical marijuana in the Garden State. The myriad regulations include a requirement that three doctors sign off on the prescription, a ban on edible forms, and a limit on dispensaries from growing more than three strains of marijuana.

These regulations have made it impossible for patients to receive the kind of cannabis that could help Vivian, which is a high-CBD, low-THC form that has none of the psychoactive effects of marijuana. That is, it can't get you high.

High-CBD marijuana has proven wildly successful in alleviating seizures, but because low-THC marijuana is less popular, it makes poor business sense for the one functioning dispensary in New Jersey to produce a strain that very few patients want to purchase.

This past June, the New Jersey state legislature passed a reform-minded medical marijuana bill which reduced the number of doctors required to sign off on a prescription to one, repealed the ban on edible forms of medicinal marijuana, and increased the number of strains dispensaries can grow.

By August, the bill had been sitting on the governor's desk for two months. When Brian Wilson heard Christie was making a campaign stop at a Scotch Plains diner, he decided to ask the governor directly, "What's the hold up?"

Christie curtly replied that while the issue is simple to Wilson, it is not simple to him, and he will make his decision based on what he thinks is right for all the people of New Jersey. As Christie turned to walk away, Wilson shouted, "Please don't let my daughter die, Governor!"

After video of the dust-up in the diner went viral, Gov. Christie agreed to a sign a compromised form of the bill, allowing for edibles for minors only. This still adversely affects Vivian, because limiting edibles to minors artificially decreases demand, making it less likely that a dispensary would make the investment in opening a kitchen and enduring all the red tape involved to produce edible forms of marijuana for an extremely limited consumer base.

And despite the fact that medical marijuana is legal in 20 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government still lists marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, making it a felony to bring it across state lines, even for medicinal purposes.

The Wilsons are considering moving to Colorado, where Vivian would have easy access to the medicine that could very well save her life. But because of federal laws, they would be forced to stay in the state indefinitely to legally maintain their daughter's supply, unable even to visit their home state for a holiday.

Despite such a predicament, Vivian's mother, Meghan, insists, "This is life and death. Our lives are devoted to keeping her alive. If this doesn't pan out in New Jersey, we will move to Colorado."

Chris Christie has made himself into a national figure by projecting a plain-speaking and defiantly independent persona. But in his opposition to his own state's law permitting medical marijuana, is the former federal prosecutor simply pandering to the national Republican base in preparation for a 2016 run for president?

"I meant what I said when I said, 'don't let my daughter die,'" insists Brian Wilson. "Politics should not be determining whether or not children live."


User avatar
The Anti-Archon
Posts: 190
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2014 2:11 pm
Reputation: 164

Postby The Anti-Archon » Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:12 pm

Chris Christie just wants you buying pot from his well-entrenched Mafia drug distribution networks, not from a clinic that fails to kick back money to him and the other kingpins. Conversely, Obama as the communist he is was setting up a state-owned, state-run distribution design. First step was to get the feds out of policing it, second step was to make money off of it for the state. Whatever his motives, it was one of the great positives of his administration.

Sessions, Christie, etc. represent the traditional drug networks (Trump, too) who want things to stay the same. Make money off selling the product, make money off policing the product, all while creating a prison-industrial slave class for the for-profit prisons. I think they even see the writing on the wall, though: Prohibition is over in all but name only. So, they need to create a different means of distribution. Enter Big Pharma who has been sticking needles in the veins of the public for years, all legal. Until such time as they absolutely have to, though, they will continue to do this War on Drugs sham because nothing is more profitable.

User avatar
Daglord
Posts: 1475
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2014 2:25 pm
Reputation: 2911

Postby Daglord » Thu Sep 28, 2017 6:25 pm

The Anti-Archon wrote:Chris Christie just wants you buying pot from his well-entrenched Mafia drug distribution networks, not from a clinic that fails to kick back money to him and the other kingpins. Conversely, Obama as the communist he is was setting up a state-owned, state-run distribution design. First step was to get the feds out of policing it, second step was to make money off of it for the state. Whatever his motives, it was one of the great positives of his administration.

Sessions, Christie, etc. represent the traditional drug networks (Trump, too) who want things to stay the same. Make money off selling the product, make money off policing the product, all while creating a prison-industrial slave class for the for-profit prisons. I think they even see the writing on the wall, though: Prohibition is over in all but name only. So, they need to create a different means of distribution. Enter Big Pharma who has been sticking needles in the veins of the public for years, all legal. Until such time as they absolutely have to, though, they will continue to do this War on Drugs sham because nothing is more profitable.


Chris Christie & Jeff Sessions don't want you buying pot from anybody, medicinal or recreational, state or private.

I don't see Obama's setting up a state-owned, state-run distribution design. if anything, he was instrumental in getting the feds to back off IMO. private "caregivers" have exploded under Obama's watch (have a couple friends that are/were), research was at an all time high (now being stifled by the current DOJ) & sentences were lightened (Sessions wants as harsh as possible).

I agree it was one of the few things he did right.

the Trump administration seems to be moving in the opposite direction... & it didn't have to be this way.

Image



Image


User avatar
Winnson
Posts: 2232
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:57 am
Reputation: 1175

Postby Winnson » Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:04 pm

Don't worry, Big Pharma always has your best interests at heart. We're in good hands.

Image

User avatar
Redneck
Posts: 345
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 7:44 am
Reputation: 243

Postby Redneck » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:18 am

Obviously this will be a different substance to K2 type synthetic weed, which is nothing at all like real weed.

That shit is fucking trippy.


Return to “The Grand Chessboard”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests